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Tea Chronicles: What is First Flush Tea?

Tea Chronicles: What is First Flush Tea?

FIRST FLUSH TEA

The first pluck of the harvest is called the first flush. The tea harvest in India is from the month of February to the month of December depending on the geographical region and the weather. The tender two leaf and a bud which blooms after the dormant period of winters is plucked to taste like sunshine in a cup. It looks bright and tastes fresh and floral.

Tea plants have five flushes or pluck: the first flush is from February to April. This is followed by the second flush that takes place from late April to June. Monsoon flush walks after the second flush. This is followed by autumn flush which takes place in the month of October and November.
Comments
  • Raj Sharma#1

    June 5, 2018 Reply

    Thanks for bringing the fact of 1st flush into limelight so that others could know about it. I too came to know through this only that 1st flush is 1st harvest which takes place in the m/o Feb & this tea leaves are tender . I think that it’s more healthier & suitable to drink.

  • Anand Aswani#2

    September 22, 2019 Reply

    What is the correct way of making tea . I mean we all drink tea everyday , but the taste just does not come out , due to incorrect method of making . Pls advise

    • admin#3

      September 24, 2019 Reply

      Hi
      2 very important points for making a good cup of tea are:
      a. Water and its heating
      b. The amount of time tea is infused/ steeped in the hot water

      Water Heating ` It is very important that the water is not over heated. Which means that it should not be over boiled. In case you are using a water heating kettle please keep the lid open and as soon as starts breaking with bubbles, shut it off and pour into a pot. If a pan is used to heat the water, similarly once it starts to boil shut off the heat and add the leaves.

      Reason : Is because water has oxygen, and its the oxygen that allows the flavor of the tea to get infused. If we over boil the water, all the oxygen gets removed and it is not possible for the flavor of the teas to be infused.

      You will see a marked difference in the taste once you start heating the water to the right temperature.

      b. Time of infusion
      Most of the times teas are said to be infused to 4-5 minutes. Varying the amount of time will lead to varied strength of the cup and flavor. We recommend 4 to 5 minutes, but it is an individual choice. If you would like a strong cup, more than 5 minutes is recommended.

      Also, various teas have different time span that they need to be infused. Which should be paid attention to.

      Wish you happy tea times!

    • admin#4

      September 24, 2019 Reply

      Hi

      When we look at making a good cup of tea there are 2 important points that need to be taken into account.

      1. Heating of the water
      2. Time allowed for the leaves to steep in the water.

      1. Heating of the water
      It is very important to keep in mind that it is the oxygen content in the water that allows the flavor of any tea to defuse in the water. Which means that over boiling of water will reduce the amount of flavor that will seep into the cup of tea.
      When the water is boiled either in a pan or a water kettle, it is important to switch off the heating as soon as the water starts bubbling. This allows the water to retain the oxygen content.
      If the water is over boiled it looses all the oxygen.
      For convenience there are temperature controlled water kettles available now, and the temperature should be kept at 90’C cut off.

      2. The amount of time the leaf is allowed to steep in the water.
      Most of the teas do well between 4 to 5 minutes of steep time. ( The leaf teas should never be boiled like we make CTC or milk teas).
      Depending on the personal choice of the strength of tea enjoyed, the timing can be changed according to personal preference.

      Hope this helps and improves the teas for you.

      Wishing you happy tea times!

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